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Posts tagged ‘government’

the call of the open road

We spent the last two weeks on the road in the western part of our country, reconnecting with friends in Salt Lake City, visiting a couple of national parks in Wyoming, soaking up Americana on July 4th, and exploring Idaho’s natural wonders – a beautiful state that had sneaked under our radar until now.

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final order of business

Our bags are (mostly) packed. The movers have come and gone. The house is empty again, a ghost of the home we have known these last two years.

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t-minus 21 days

We’re down to three weeks, and while our transfer and home leave plans are still a bit up in the air, it is no longer possible to duck the rapidly approaching reality of our imminent departure from Rwanda.

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conventional headache

For the second time during our tour, Kigali this week played host to a large gathering of international leaders as they succeeded in hammering out a significant accord.

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the right way to start the new year

Watching the small island nation where we had spent the previous week grow ever smaller as the plane rose above the Indian Ocean, we experienced a familiar mix of emotions. The reservoir of relaxation we had built up during three weeks of R&R started to recede somewhat as we contemplated the long, difficult trip home: multiple flights and long layovers with two small kids in tow. We arrived back in Kigali late Sunday night, the uncertainty of our government shutdown adding an unpleasant wrinkle to the end of our vacation. And yet, we felt buoyant.

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read the fine print!

After being involved in a dispute, it’s advisable to let the dust settle and one’s emotions cool before mentally revisiting it to identify lessons learned. Having thus allowed some time to elapse since our months-long dispute with the State Department, we thought it might be instructive – as much for ourselves as for other FSOs who read this blog – to dissect the incident. Read more

wheels up

The end of the year has a tendency to sneak up without much warning in Rwanda. Unlike its neighbors – and, for that matter, most other countries we’ve called home – which take a break from official business around mid-December, Rwanda keeps chugging along without too much holiday fanfare. Last week, for example, the ruling party held its thirtieth anniversary party congress, and this week the entire country is focused on its annual National Dialogue.

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handshakes and air kisses

Painful as the annual evaluation process is, bidding is unquestionably the most unpleasant aspect of working in our nation’s Foreign Service.

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Mahama to New York

The distance between New York City, where D grew up, and Mahama, nestled against the bank of the Kagera River, which serves as the natural boundary between Rwanda and Tanzania, cannot be measured in miles and feet alone. A barren parcel of tse-tse fly-infested land just a couple of years ago, Mahama now hosts more than 55,000 refugees from Burundi, who began streaming into Rwanda in the spring of 2015 and continue to arrive in smaller numbers more than two years later.

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unplugged

The first four months of our Rwanda tour we mostly stayed put, only leaving Kigali a couple of times for weekend trips to Akagera and Nyungwe and venturing out of the country once to play in an Ultimate Frisbee tournament in Kampala. Starting with D’s trip to Bangkok, the last two months by contrast have been full of travel and adventure. We made a couple of jaunts north of the border to Uganda, spent a weekend tracking golden monkeys in Volcanoes National Park, and just returned home from two wonderful weeks in Namibia and a visit to Victoria Falls.

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