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Posts tagged ‘friends’

one day at a time

“Chunk it!” Munchkin’s favorite reading tool – trying to decipher an unfamiliar word by “chunking” it into smaller, easier-to-read portions – seems like an apt strategy for navigating these uncertain times. With the global pandemic still on the upswing, our 30-day quarantine may well be the beginning of a much longer period of imposed isolation. China is just now beginning to emerge from its two-months-long lockdown. Looking ahead to potentially many months of this new status quo is a depressing thought indeed. Focusing on the now and taking things one day at a time, on the other hand, is helping maintain our sanity and nurture the hope that things will turn okay on the other side of these dark, troubled times.

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high life

After nearly a decade in the Foreign Service, the appeal of the lifestyle has lost none of its luster even if the novelty of the experience has worn off a bit, both for us and our loved ones.

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a tale of dragons and water puppets

Arriving in Ha Long after spending the better part of a week in rural Vietnam is a bit of a shock to the senses. Parts of the city along Vietnam’s most famous bay feel like they have been transplanted from Europe; the French architectural influence is unmistakable. And whereas we hardly saw a soul in Pu Luong, at the Ha Long boat terminal we found an assembly line-like tourist infrastructure designed to process thousands of visitors per day. Six million foreigners visit Ha Long Bay each year, making it far and away Vietnam’s top tourist attraction.

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rainy rendezvous in Rizal

Another weekend, another trip to Rizal. Last time, we got a bunch of our friends together for an adults-only playscape adventure. This time, we planned the outing with our kids’ social circle in mind, joining forces with another family for a weekend getaway in the foothills of Mt. Purro.

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into the heart of rural Vietnam

The struggles we faced in Japan were very much on our minds in planning our Vietnam itinerary. The kids were hard to contain in Japan’s big cities, so we scheduled our Vietnam trip to focus on rural landscapes and natural exploration. We also got in touch with a colleague of S’s who is serving in Hanoi. Her kids are a little order than ours, but we figured having playmates might cushion the blow of landing in a new, unfamiliar country, so we arranged to spend our first weekend in Vietnam together in Pu Luong.

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rainforest playland

Rizal Province, with its jagged limestone peaks, forested views across the Sierra Madre Mountains, and proximity to Manila, is fast becoming our favorite day-trip getaway destination. We loved the Trilogy hike and have found ourselves returning to Rizal with regularity since the Taal Volcano eruption affected the primary route to beaches and other places of interest south of the capital. After some beach time in Palawan with S’s family, we headed back to Rizal for a hike through the Masungi Georeserve.

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Kathmandu after dark

Certain countries possess an undeniable mystique, holding sway over one’s imagination long before one has the opportunity to visit. For D, Nepal was high on this list, though his fascination had more to do with the country’s landscape than its reputed spirituality (as one travel guide puts it, “Nepal is a one-stop spiritual destination: every activity here revolves around finding yourself, seeking your roots…”). Ever since D got into mountain climbing during his Peace Corps days in Ecuador – and especially after reading a handful of mountaineering books – he had longed to see the Himalayas.

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strangers in a strange land

Since returning from Japan, we have visited Vietnam and Laos, and D has also traveled to Nepal for work. Those trips did nothing to dispel a notion that began forming in our minds as we made our way from Kyoto to the Japanese Alps and back, and which has solidified with our subsequent travels. Part of Japan’s mystique, and the reason we think Western travelers find the country at once alluring and bewildering, is that it feels uniquely foreign in a way that other foreign countries do not.

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Pinoy punk

We’ve written several posts about D’s love of live music, and the dearth thereof at every post we’ve served, but the subject bears revisiting – not only because, as Nietzsche wrote, without music life would be a mistake, but also because Manila figures to be quite different from our previous tours in this respect.

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between two decades

We didn’t quite make it to midnight, seeing off the last few hours of the decade without fanfare at a transit hotel outside Noi Bai Airport. We did get an early start to 2020, however, rising before the sun for our return flight to Manila after splitting the last dozen days between Vietnam and Laos.

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